Prepping your Hair for Wigs – How to

Prepping your Hair for wigs - long Nigerian hair

Hello. I’m back with my wig regimen. I intend to take a break from styling & manipulating my natural hair. As usual, my go-to is a wig. Some of us enjoying wigs for a variety of reasons. For me, when my schedule becomes crazy or I want to take a break of my hair, I resort to wigs. However, prepping your hair for wigs is important. You should do it at least a week before you start wearing the wig.

Prepping your Hair for Wigs

1.Deep Condition: This is very important especially if you are wearing your wigs for more than a week. I used Creme of Nature Masque to deep condition at least a week before I start to wear my wigs.

Prepping your hair for wigs - long Nigerian hair

2. Moisturize: You might already have moisturized & sealed your hair after deep conditioning it, but you have to check again to make sure there is no dry strand of hair anywhere. Because your hair will be hidden under a wig does not mean you should neglect moisturizing it.

3. Plait beneath the Wig: You should also consider the kind of plait that will be under your wig. If I am wearing a straight wig, I prefer to do Didi. This way there are no bumps protruding out of the wig & the wig sits well on the scalp. Yo can do flat twists if you want your wig to appear fuller.

Prepping your hair for wigs - long Nigerian hair

4.Daily Care: I prefer to spray a mixture of water & olive oil on the plaits every morning.

Prepping your hair for wigs - long Nigerian hair

The Wig(Find it here):

Prepping your hair for wigs - long Nigerian hair

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One Scarf, Tied 5 Different Ways

scarf styles - long Nigerian hair

Scarves add a “zing” to your outfit. They are also great for covering up a bad hair day. Have a scarf and not sure how to tie it? This post’s for you. For the 5 styles done in the post, I used a pashmina that is soft in texture. This allows for flexibility when trying to achieve a style.

1. The Top Knot: An amazing style when you want a chic look. It works well with casual & semi-formal outfits.

Steps:

i. Starting from the back, tie the two lengths of the pashmina in front once.

ii.Twist one length and turn it at the front part of your head. Do the same for the other length

iii. Tuck the ends of both ends into each other at the top. Viola!

scarf styles - long Nigerian hair

2. One-Sided Croissant: Not edible though, lol, its shape reminds you of croissant. You can pair this style with your casual tops & dresses.

Steps:

i. Start from the back of your head. Tie the two lengths in front once.

ii. Twist both lengths across each other to form the croissant.

iii. Wrap the length across one side of your head. Tuck it in at the back

scarf styles - long Nigerian hair

3. Iya Mi Leko: This style is popular among the women who sell fabrics on Lagos Island hence the name. You can do this style with an Ankara scarf on Fridays or Sundays to church.

Steps:

i. Start front the front part of your head & tie the two lengths at the back.

ii. Pass the right length over half part of your head to the left. Pass the left length to the right

iii. Tie both ends at the back.

scarf styles - long Nigerian hair

 

4. Double Twists: Inspired by Angelique Kidjo, this is one style that looks great when paired with denim.

Steps:

i. Tie both lengths of the scarf to the front

ii. Twist each individual lengths. Wrap the right length over to the left & vice versa

iii. Knot the ends of both lengths

5. Low-back Donut: One of my favorites. This can be put together in less than 3 minutes.

Steps:

i. Start from the back and tie the 2 lengths at the back.

ii. Create a halo at the back by wrapping the right length in circles. Do the same for the left length

iii. Tuck the ends into the created donut.

scarf styles - long Nigerian hair

Which is your favorite?

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Vegetable Drying with Harmattan

vegetable drying - long Nigerian hair

Hello! Trust your week was awesome! You might have thought you stumbled on the wrong blog when you saw today’s blog post title. Fear not! We would be adding some flavor to your favorite blog this year. We understand that eating healthy can also help us positively on our healthy hair journeys. So, we would have fun posts on natural food items especially fruit & vegetables recipes. First up, we would learn vegetable drying with harmattan wind.

The vegetable dried with the harmattan wind was Clove Basil. It is known as Efirin in Yoruba, Daidoya in Hausa & Nchuanwu in Igbo. I decided to dry the leaves of this plant because I am not sure I would get them easily again in the next 3 months.

Vegetable Drying with Harmattan- How to

Preparing: I rinsed the leaves with running water to remove dust & dirt from the clove basil. I then spread them on a large tray. I used a a sieve cloth to cover the tray.This way, dirt & insects will not get on the leaves.

Drying: I put the tray out in the mornings when the harmattan breeze was at its driest, the sun at its peak at noon & brought it in the evening.

Results:

By the fifth day, the leave were already dry & brittle. I checked to make sure there was no moisture left. I then dried it for an extra day.

vegetable drying - long Nigerian hair

vegetable drying - long Nigerian hair

Storage: To store the dried leaves, i cleaned an air-tight glass bottle to remove moisture. Thankfully all the leaves entered in the bottle.

vegetable drying - long Nigerian hair

Usage: You might be wandering how I intend to use my dried clove basil leaves. Trust me, they add a delicious flavor to beans & yam porridge. I will also crush some between my fingers and add them to my smoothies.

Did I mention that the smell of the clove basil seems stronger when dried? You should try drying yours.

Ever dried a fruit or vegetable with harmattan or sunshine? Please share your experience.

 

 

 

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How to Achieve the Wodaabe Hair Look

Wodaabe hair look - long Nigerian hair

Happy new year! 2017 is full of opportunities for us to learn & unlearn about life including our hair journeys of course. Last week, there was a post about the Wodaabe tribe in Nigeria and hair lessons we could use from them. I decided to try out some of their interesting hair styles on my hair. Prior to doing this, I already had my wash day where I fortified my hair with Aphogee Keratin Reconstructor. This protected my hair from breakage while I manipulated it to achieve the style. So, let’s see how to achieve the Wodaabe hair look.

1. I divided my hair into 4 unequal halves. I divided the sides in such a way that when I plait them, their braids will dangle in front. I also made middle front part bigger than the one at the back.

Wodaabe hair look - long Nigerian hair

2. I started off by doing didi plaits on both sides and at the back too.

4. For the front part, I did didi as well. Towards the ends where a braid should be, it was not braided. it was converted to a pompadour.

5. I finished off by using a string of blue beads to decorate the style.

Wodaabe hair look - long Nigerian hair

Pros of Wodaabe Hair Look

  • It is an amazing protective style with the ends of your hair tucked in.
  • Heavy manipulation of your hair is also not required.

Cons of Wodaabe Hair Look

  • You are going to receive a lot of stares from people the day you do this style. If you are the shy type, you may not want to do it.
  • If your skin is prone to acne, the full pompadour in front might rub against your skin and trigger break outs. You can raise the pompadour higher away from your skin to prevent this.
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ApHogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor Review

Aphogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor Review

Happy New Year! Welcome to 2017. Today’s product is one of my favorite protein deep conditioners. I started using it at the beginning of my hair journey, and I have stuck with it since then. Anytime I noticed that my hair remained dull & lifeless no matter how often I deep conditioned, I quickly turn to my ApHogee Keratin treatment. As soon as  I am done with it, my hair is restored to life. I use it every 6 weeks so that my hair does not become unnecessarily hard. Below is the Aphogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor Review.

ApHogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor Review.

Price: I bought 8oz at N2,800 last year. However, due to the current inflation, it is currently sold between N3,800- N4900 on online stores.

Product Claim from ApHogee’s Website:

ApHogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor is a powerful, one step treatment that should be used for home use, between salon visits.  This concentrated blend of keratin amino acids, botanical oils, and vitamins does wonders to restore strength and softness to hair that requires a deep, penetrating treatment.  It is recommended on tinted, bleached or relaxed hair.  ApHogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor helps repair damage caused by chlorine and hard water.  Apply on clean hair in shower and rinse to treat brittle hair with cuticle damage and moderate breakage.  It soothes irritated scalp and may be applied following each shampooing until the healthy condition of the hair is restored.

Aphogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor Review
ApHogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor applied to hair

Consistency: It is semi-thick & not runny.Little goes a long way with this product.

Does my hair love it? Ah! Of course. Only that I have to do a moisturizing deep conditioning session afterwards so that my hair is not to hard.

Aphogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor Review
Dried & moisturized hair after using the product

How long does the product last? I use this product every 6-8 weeks. Most times, I use an 8 oz bottle for an entire year.

Will I continue to use ApHogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor? It is officially my staple product for keratin treatment.

Ingredients:

Water, Cetearyl Alcohol, Polysorbate 60, Behenamidopropylamine Behenatem Stearolkonium Chloride, Cetrimonium Chloride, Cocodimonium Hydrolyzed Hair Keratin, Hydrolzed Mucopolysac Charides, Sodium Coco Collagen Amino Acids, Wheat Germ Fatty Acids, Linoleic Acid, Linolenic Acid, Arachidonic Acid, Squalane, Avocado Oil, Acetimide MEA, Panthenol, Wheat Germ Oil, Jojoba Oil, Tocopherol, Tocopheryl Acetate, Sulfur, Amodimethicone, Polyquaternium 10, Linoleamidopropyl PG Dimonium, Chloride Phosphate, Tallowtrimonium Chloride, Nonoxynol 10, Cocoyl Sarcosine, Sorbitol, Fragrance, Imidazolidinyl Urea, Methylparaben, Propylparaben.

Ever tried ApHogee Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor? Please share your thoughts.

REFERENCE

Keratin 2 Minute Reconstructor

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Wodaabe Women Hair Growth Lessons

Wodaabe Women Hair Growth Lessons - long Nigerian hair

As a little kid living in Kogi state, I remember seeing Wodaabe women with their long luscious hair and caramel-colored skin. They always dressed the same way, with same tattoos and henna designs. When we moved to Lagos state, I noticed that quite a number of Lagosians patronized Wodaabe women for their hair dyes and concoctions that was believed to made hair grow. Our landlady was one of these customers. Unfortunately, her hair never grew past her neck area. This could be because using products alone can’t make your hair grow, how you take care of your hair is much more important.  However, these Wodaabe women with long & shiny hair do some things to their hair we can learn from. See Wodaabe women hair growth lessons below.

Moisturizing: Wodaabe women apply Mai Shanu (cow butter from raw cow milk) on their hair to soften it & also add shine. We may not have to go looking for Mai Shanu, but we must not forget the importance of moisturizing our hair regularly with water, natural oils & butters. Instead of Mai Shanu, you can use Shea butter or even mango butter to seal in moisture into your hair.

Wodaabe Women Hair Growth Lessons - long Nigerian hair
Shea Butter

Protective Styling: One of Wodaabe women hair growth lessons is that of protective styling.  All the Wodaabe women I have seen usually have their hair in stylish plaits. Because of the hot weather in the northern part of Nigeria as well as their religion, they sometime protect their hair in loose scarves. Now that the harmattan is here, protect your hair with low manipulative styles if you can.

Wodaabe Women Hair Growth Lessons - long Nigerian hair
Source: Wikipedia

Decorating: Multi-colored small & medium sized beads, cowries, bones, etc usually decorate their hair. These beads are arranged at the tips of the braids  & also wrapped around their foreheads. So, whip out your Alice bands, scrunchies & other accessories & let’s get stylish.

REFERENCES

http://pancocojams.blogspot.com.ng/2014/07/examples-of-fulani-african-female.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fula_people

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Harmattan Hair Care Regimen

As I stepped out of the gate of my house this morning, I felt the cold breeze of the harmattan. I quickly went back into the house and took my pashmina. On my way to work, I noticed the usual haze that comes with harmattan mornings; it was then I realized that I am yet to put together a concrete hair regimen for this season. This weather is known for its dryness. Your wet clothes can be dried in less than 10 minutes with the wind of this weather.  Luckily for me, my hair is already in a protective style (box braids). But then, I realized that protective styling my hair is not enough for a harmattan hair care regimen. I have decided to do a few things more.

1. LCO Instead of LOC: There’s been some argument that there is no real difference whether you do the LCO or LOC method. However, I realized that the LCO method keeps my hair moisturized for longer. I apply my leave in conditioner, followed by shea butter and then olive oil. I will be adding the LOC method to my harmattan hair care regimen.

Harmattan hair care regimen - long Nigerian hair

2. Styling with Scarves: When I take out my box braids, I intend to style/cover my hair with scarves especially when going out in the mornings when the wind is at its driest. It is always a wonder to see how quickly your wet hair gets so dry & brittle by the harmattan wind. One has to be careful. No breakage allowed.

Harmattan hair care regimen - long Nigerian hair

3. Daily Moisturizing: For the past two months, I have been moisturizing and sealing my hair every other day. But with this weather, I have to moisturize & seal my hair every day preferably in the mornings.

4. Satin Sleep Caps: I am already used to wearing my satin cap to bed every night, but sometimes, I am really tired & just fall asleep on the couch. With the harmattan, there are no excuses not to wear my satin cap to sleep.

Harmattan hair care regimen - long Nigerian hair

5. Water Intake: I currently take about 2 liters of water daily. I intend to increase it to 2 & a half or even 3 to moisturize from inside out.

Harmattan hair care regimen - long Nigerian hair

Tel us! What is your harmattan hair care regimen?

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